Part 3: Carpal tunnel and adhesion

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In part 2, we mentioned how adhesion can cause median nerve entrapment. This section will explain this concept in more detail.

Adhesion is the most common cause of pain and stiffness in the body and generally forms from overuse during typing, gripping, and repetitive use of your hands. Adhesion will act like glue in the muscle making the muscle weaker, less flexible and can also glue a muscle and nerve together preventing the nerve from moving properly, causing irritation to the nerve and tingling into your fingers.

Below is a video of Dr. Brady, the founder of Integrative Diagnosis (Again more on this in part 4) explaining nerve entrapment. He is demonstrating how the median nerve cannot glide freely when it is adhered to the muscle in your forearm.

The entrapment that he is demonstrating will cause tingling into the same fingers as carpal tunnel syndrome. (Note from Dr. Phipps: Many patients will come in to my office with the diagnosis of “carpal tunnel syndrome” and have complete resolution of their symptoms when this nerve entrapment is fixed in the forearm.) Nerve entrapments can occur at multiple spots and each one needs to be ruled out.

Adhesion will also play a role if your pain is being generated from your neck. Adhesion will result in more compression to your spine causing more irritation of the spinal nerves that travel down your arm, resulting in more symptoms in your fingers. Breaking down adhesion and restoring the strength and flexibility to your neck will decompress your spine and provide a healing environment for your nerves so you have less symptoms into your fingers.

In the final part of this series we will go over where to start with treatment so you can be sure that you receive the correct treatment in the correct area.

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